REELY'S
AUDIO POEMS

Reely's Shop: Shakespeare · Bronte Sisters · Dostoevsky · Charles Dickens · Characters/Quotes · Top Picks >>>

Longfellow
Contemporaries

Victor Hugo
Tennyson
Samuel Ferguson
Edward Lear

More Longfellow:
My Lost Youth - Often I think of the beautiful town ...
Paul Revere's Ride - Listen my children and you ...
Psalm of Life - Tell me not in mournful numbers ...
The Children's Hour - Between the dark and the daylight ...
The Tide Rises, The Tide Fall - the twilight darkens ...
The Wreck of the Hesperus - it was the schooner ...

The Village Blacksmith
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

click arrow to start

UNDER a spreading chestnut tree
     The village smithy stands;
The smith, a mighty man is he,
     With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
     Are strong as iron bands.

His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
     His face is like the tan;
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
     He earns whate'er he can,
And looks the whole world in the face,
     For he owes not any man.

Week in, week out, from morn till night,
     You can hear his bellows blow;
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge
     With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell,
     When the evening sun is low.

And children coming home from school
     Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
     And hear the bellows roar,
And watch the burning sparks that fly
     Like chaff from a threshing-floor.

He goes on Sunday to the church,
     And sits among his boys;
He hears the parson pray and preach,
     He hears his daughter's voice,
Singing in the village choir,
     And it makes his heart rejoice.

It sounds to him like her mother's voice,
     Singing in Paradise!
He needs must think of her once more,
     How in the grave she lies;
And with his hard, rough hand he wipes
     A tear out of his eyes.

Toiling,—rejoicing,—sorrowing,
     Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
     Each evening sees it close;
Something attempted, something done,
     Has earned a night's repose.

Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
     For the lesson thou hast taught!
Thus at the flaming forge of life
     Our fortunes must be wrought;
Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
     Each burning deed and thought! 

Home
Poem Index
Poets Wall
Audio Poems
Cool Stuff
Reely's Blog

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(1807-1882)

Longfellow's works ranged from sentimental pieces such as 'The Village Blacksmith' to translations of Dante. Among his most interesting works are EVANGELINE (1847), a narrative poem of the former French colony of Acadia, echoing such epics as Homer's Odyssey, and THE SONG OF HIAWATHA (1855), especially noted for its sing-song meter and shamanistic rhythm. more

Men · Women · American · Australian · Canadian · English · French · German · Hispanic · Irish · Russian · Scottish
Village Blacksmith Poster
Village Blacksmith Poster by vintageamerican
What Did You Think?

Did you like this poem?
It's great
It's good
It's okay
No
I don't know

Sir Walter ScottPaul Laurence DunbarEdgar Allan PoeLaura E. RichardsRobert Louis StevensonMikhail LermontovAleksey Koltov

VJ Web Designs

Email: webmaster@reelyredd.com